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Alternative models of education delivery
UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education [corporate]

PublishedSeptember 2012
Type of workPolicy Brief
PeriodicalPages 1-12
PublisherUNESCO

ABSTRACT
The key goal of this Policy Brief is to produce a number of alternative models of education delivery in the formal education sector. It was felt that the creation of five alternative models would sufficiently populate the various subsectors of formal education. The models have to be “archetypal” in the sense of being easy and quick to describe, memorable, repeatable to others without distortion, and translatable into other languages. In practical terms they should also be generalisable, scalable, sustainable, deployable without further research, and deliverable in most high-income economies. For each model the features, the advantages and the disadvantages are outlined, followed by the policy shifts (if any) necessary to facilitate their development. The models described are an ICT-rich primary school, a virtual supplementary school for specialist subjects (e.g. science), a college model based on OER for trade skills, the Multeversity (a 21st century reconceptualisation of the 20th century polytechnic/university of applied science) and a support/network model for research intensive elite universities.

Keywords blended learning · MOOC · resource-based learning · sustainability · virtual university

Published atRussian Federation
ISSN2221-8378
Rights© UNESCO IITE 1997-2016
URLhttp://iite.unesco.org/publications/3214709/
Export optionsBibTex · EndNote · Tagged XML · Google Scholar



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