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Integrating a MOOC into the postgraduate ELT curriculum: Reflecting on students' beliefs with a MOOC blend
Orsini-Jones, Marina · Gafaro, Barbara Conde · Altamimi, Shooq

PublishedJune 2017
PeriodicalChapter 7, Pages 71-83
PublisherBeyond the language classroom: Researching MOOCs and other innovations, Research-publishing.net
EditorsQian, Kan and Bax, Stephen
CountryUnited Kingdom, Europe

ABSTRACT
This chapter builds on the outcomes of a blended learning action-research project in its third iteration (academic year 2015-16). The FutureLearn Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Understanding Language: Learning and Teaching was integrated into the curriculum of the Master of Arts (MA) in English Language Teaching (ELT) at Coventry University (UK). The MOOC was designed by the University of Southampton in collaboration with the British Council and many of its topics appeared to coincide with those on the MA in ELT module ‘Theories and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching’. The initial blend trialled for the project included all students covering the same topics in various ways, e.g. in face-to-face workshops at Coventry University, on the MOOC with thousands of participants, and on the institutional virtual learning environment – Moodle – with peers on the module. This enhanced blend afforded unique opportunities for reflection on the problematic areas of knowledge encountered by students on the MA in ELT, such as learner autonomy. The work reported here was carried out by one of the authors (Altamimi), an ‘expert student’ who replicated the research design of the first cycles of the study carried out by Orsini Jones in 2014 and 2015, and focused on learners’ beliefs, rather than on learner autonomy.

Keywords blended learning · ELT · learners' beliefs · MOOC · research project

RefereedYes
Rightsby/2.0
DOI10.14705/rpnet.2017.mooc2016.672
Export optionsBibTex · EndNote · Tagged XML · Google Scholar



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