The OER Knowledge Cloud makes use of cookies. By continuing, you consent to this use. More information.
Adapting a MOOC for research: Lessons learned from the first presentation of literature and mental health: Reading for wellbeing
Hodge, Rachael

PublishedDecember 2016
JournalJournal of Interactive Media in Education
Volume 2016(1)

ABSTRACT
The University of Warwick’s FutureLearn MOOC Literature and Mental Health: Reading for Wellbeing, which began its first presentation February 2016, was identified as an opportunity to conduct some research into the course subject area, ‘reading for wellbeing’ or ‘bibliotherapy’. Since 2013, a substantial body of literature has emerged in the field of MOOC-related research, with the MOOC becoming both the subject of and vehicle for research. The research approach adopted in Literature and Mental Health was influenced by other, recent research studies conducted within MOOCs, and particularly by the first presentation of Monash University’s Mindfulness for Wellbeing and Peak Performance FutureLearn MOOC, which distributed a stress survey to its learners in the first and final weeks of the course, to assess the efficacy of the course’s mindfulness practices.
A number of reasons for trialling the use of this MOOC as a research tool were identified at the project’s outset. MOOCs give researchers access to large numbers of possible research participants, making MOOC research an attractive prospect, while the opportunity to gather valuable, potentially publishable data from free online courses may help to justify the time and resources expended during the production of new MOOCs. Several additional benefits of in-MOOC research were discovered during the process, including the potential for research activities to enrich the learner experience. However, a number of challenges and limitations were also encountered during the development of the study; the inevitable self-selection bias among MOOC learners, and the difficulty of establishing a control group within the MOOC activities, posed impediments to the gathering of useful, publishable data.
Although we were aware of other MOOCs which had been used as vehicles for research, the process of adapting Literature and Mental Health for this research study was nonetheless an illuminating and instructive experience. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on that experience, and to consider the lessons learned during the process which may be useful in informing future research studies conducted via Massive Open Online Courses.

Keywords bibliotherapy · MOOC · online learning · research

RefereedYes
Rightsby/4.0
URLhttp://doi.org/10.5334/jime.428
Export optionsBibTex · EndNote · Tagged XML · Google Scholar



AVAILABLE FILES
428-3358-1-PB.pdf · 1.2MB



Viewed by 16 distinct readers




CLOUD COMMUNITY REVIEWS

The evaluations below represent the judgements of our readers and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Cloud editors.

Click a star to be the first to rate this document


POST A COMMENT
SIMILAR RECORDS

Russian perspectives of online learning technologies in higher education: An empirical study of a MOOC
Larionova, Viola; Brown, Ken; Bystrova, Tatiana; Sinitsyn, Evgueny
There has been a rapid growth of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in the global education market in the last decade. Online learning technologies are becoming increasingly widespread in the non-formal education ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

Grit and intention: Why do learners complete MOOCs?
Wang, Yuan; Baker, Ryan
In recent years there has been considerable interest in how many learners complete MOOCs, and what factors during usage can predict completion. Others, however, have argued that many learners never intend to complete ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

All things considered: Educational radio as the first MOOCs
Dousay, Tonia A.; Janak, Edward
Those who do not learn history, even educational technology history, are doomed to repeat it. Every windshield has a rear-view mirror: using historical trends can yield lessons and guidance as we navigate the future. ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

HarvardX and MITx: The first year of open online courses: Fall 2012-summer 2013
Ho, Andrew Dean; Reich, Justin; Nesterko, Sergiy O.; Seaton, Daniel Thomas; et al.
HarvardX and MITx are collaborative institutional efforts between Harvard University and MIT to enhance campus-based education, advance educational research, and increase access to online learning opportunities ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

A social network perspective on peer supported learning in MOOCs for educators
Kellogg, Shaun; Booth, Sherry; Oliver, Kevin; McGreal, Rory; Conrad, Dianne
A recent phenomenon in the MOOC space has been the development of courses tailored to educators serving in K-12 settings. MOOCs, particularly as a form of educator professional development, face a number of challenges. ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

MOOCs as a method of distance education in the Arab World – A review paper
Adham, Raniah Samir; Lundqvist, Karsten Oster
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in the Arab World are still in their infancy. Many Arab countries are now starting to launch their MOOC platforms; however, there are only a few who have actually implemented such ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

Writing to learn and learning to write across the disciplines: Peer-to-peer writing in introductory-level MOOCs
Comer, Denise; Clark, Charlotte; Canelas, Dorian; McGreal, Rory; Conrad, Dianne
This study aimed to evaluate how peer-to-peer interactions through writing impact student learning in introductory-level massive open online courses (MOOCs) across disciplines. This article presents the results of a ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

Massive Open Online Courses: Innovation in education?
Siemens, George; McGreal, Rory; Kinuthia, Wanjira; Marshall, Stewart
Match: MOOC; online learning

Characterizing video use in the catalogue of MITx MOOCs
Seaton, Daniel T.; Nesterko, Sergiy; Mullaney, Tommy; Reich, Justin; et al.
Lecture videos intended to substitute or parallel the on-campus experience are a central component of nearly all current Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Recent analysis of resources used in the inaugural course ...
Match: MOOC; online learning

Challenges of identifying second language English speakers in MOOCs
Duru, Ismail; Sunar, Ayse Saliha; Dogan, Gulustan; White, Su; et al.
In this study, we aim to analyse English as a Second Language (ESL) and English as a First Language (EFL) MOOC participants' engagements in a MOOC. We aim to find out key points which directly effect learners' dropout ...
Match: MOOC; online learning